Madeleine Albright, the first woman to become U.S. secretary of state, has died

Madeleine Albright, the first woman to become U.S. secretary of state, has died

Madeleine Albright, the first woman to be U.S. secretary of state, has died, according to a statement from her family.

Albright was 84, and the cause of death was cancer, her family said. "She was surrounded by family and friends. We have lost a loving mother, grandmother, sister, aunt, and friend," the statement said.

Albright was born in what was then Czechoslovakia and fled with her family after the Nazis occupied the country in 1939.

Albright was born in what was then Czechoslovakia and fled with her family after the Nazis occupied the country in 1939.

Albright's father Josef was part of the Czechoslovak Foreign Service and became ambassador to Yugoslavia, according to a biography from the State Department's Office of the Historian.

Biden has also ordered flags at the White House and on U.S. public buildings and grounds to be flown at half-staff to honor Albright.

Before serving as secretary of state, she was appointed ambassador to the United Nations by Clinton in 1993.

"She left an indelible mark on the world and on the United Nations. Our country and our United Nations are stronger for her service," Thomas-Greenfield said.

Before serving as secretary of state, she was appointed ambassador to the United Nations by Clinton in 1993.

President Biden commented on the challenges Albright faced as a young woman.